Tag Archives: Dawn Elyse Warden-Reeder

Divorce: The 7-Letter Word I Never Want to Hear Again—or Want My Kids to Hear

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When marital bliss fades into divorce

By the end of 2014, I will officially be divorced for a second time, a fact that has left me deeply heartbroken and carrying a profound sense of failure, and to a degree, shame. These last two sentiments, the byproduct of being a parent and feeling responsible for my children’s perception of marriage as they evolve from teens and young adults into husbands and wives. I don’t have to tell anyone who’s been through it. Divorce is a gut-wrenching experience. 

As I told my three youngest on a very sad Friday afternoon after their stepfather had come over to talk about his decision to divorce, my respect and appreciation for marriage—and the belief that a happy, life-long relationship is possible—has not wavered. I was clear that marriage is hard work and that there are ebbs and flows of great times, good times, just OK times and pretty sucky times—much like the dynamics of sibling relationships. 

We talked about some marriages needing to end because of alcoholism, drug addiction, abuse, mental illness and other reasons more nebulous, such as one spouse wanting freedom or more personal time to pursue a non-traditional career. But my message remained the same: Marriage is not easy under perfect conditions and there are rarely perfect conditions. My advice was to prepare themselves not for the ideal times, but for the challenging times, so that they have the tools and mindset to stay the course (or right an already sinking ship) when the fireworks die down, responsibilities multiply, money dwindles and tensions and miscommunications rise.

I assured them that many of these things will happen, but also that they’re not valid reasons to head toward the door and away from the serious commitment that they’ve made to themselves and to another person. I didn’t need to tell them that divorce brings with it a lot of pain and loss; they’ve already been there. Going through it a second time has been incredibly debilitating to me. They may be processing it differently, but they’ve not been immune and are old enough to form their own opinions and to put up emotional walls.

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If I didn’t say it earlier, I am not proud of being divorced.

Not once, and certainly not twice. I worry about what it conveys to those who don’t know me, who I will meet in professional settings. Inevitably the personal questions come up, and to me, I feel that “twice-divorced” reflects something negative about my character that could be misjudged by someone wanting to do business with or hire me. I don’t know if others have thought about this in similar fashion. I certainly did not “opt in” for this second divorce, yet I can’t shake the notion that it makes me look tarnished in some way. This is not a judgement on anyone out there who has been in my shoes; I know many people for whom the third time really was the charm. Then again, I know many, including my father, for whom that was not true. But where he was unlucky, and occasionally foolish in love, he was rich in parenting skills and has been a devoted father to his own brood of five.

My mother, though separated and divorced from him when I was still a baby, did go on to have a very long and generally happy and satisfying second marriage. However, divorce is a part of my genetics. I wasn’t happy about it as a kid, and I am less so today. Because no matter how much of a modern woman that I am, I still believe in marriage. I believe in the beauty of a longterm relationship where a couple can look back at the roller coaster ride they’ve been on and say, “Despite the odds, the disconnected times, the outside distractions to romance and coupledom, financial straits and mismatched schedules, we made it.” 

My first marriage lasted 16 years. This new marriage, 20 months. A damn shame, because many couples therapists will say that the first year of marriage is often the hardest. And in fact, this turned out to be true more at the start of Year Two when the pressure of finances, slow-growing entrepreneurships, job hunts, sports schedules and teenage angst and antics crept in to our sacred space. We both knew what we were dealing with, having been under the same roof for two years prior to our getting hitched, but our expectations and commitment were different. 

I can only speak for myself, as that is the fair and courteous thing to do, but after making mistakes and not trying hard enough to save my first marriage, I was determined to do the in-depth analysis, use the tools and make the lifestyle adjustments to take this second one to the next level. That doesn’t mean I didn’t make mistakes along the way, but I said “I do” at the altar with 120% intent to stay married. 

Which is why, along with the heartbreak and sense of betrayal in our disparate commitment, I feel vast disappointment in both myself and my husband. And, the need to express my stance against divorce as the mature way to correct relationship issues and personal shortcomings. Doing the work, as a couple and individually, when you really don’t want to, is where maturity and growth flourish. And who among us does not need a dose of both now and again? 

Divorce a second time around

When my first husband and I separated then divorced, there were very specific reasons, and I openly claim a lion’s share of responsibility. I remember the therapist telling us during one session, that repair takes a lot of time, years even, and that staying in a marriage when there are difficulties and hurts is so much harder than walking away, but that the definition of marriage is “commitment to doing the work.”  

We thought a lot about what she said, but ultimately, we didn’t know where to pick up the pieces and were too wounded to try. So when he asked me one day, if we thought we could put things back together—a few months after we had both started new romantic relationships—I told him I thought it would be too hard because of there now being other people entangled in our hearts and bodies, and he agreed. Deep down, what I felt most at that moment, and why the pain side is so deep for me in this second divorce, was that I didn’t want to spend the rest of my life wondering what might have been with this new man in my life. 

(Cue Alanis Morrisette…)

10120882-1002Fast-forward 10 years and here I am again. Though my signature is still needed, the future has been sealed: Another retainer fee, another round of furniture and clothing and tools and bikes and stereo systems and jewelry and lingerie and photographs and memories to pack into boxes; passwords to be changed and dates to be forgotten, friends to be lost, and now, Facebook to fret over… Another broken-home experience for my children and another reason for them to be very anxious about how their own marriages will turn out. Or if they’ll ever trust themselves or their own family history enough to take that step at all. They may be older this time around, but I know from my parents’ history that reluctantly adjusting to stepparents and then having to undo that relationship and the associated emotions, particularly trust, still has impact, even for high school and college-aged “kids.”

All of the above is why I am daring to share these words, and why I will continue to write about this in some form for months to come. I want my children to believe that they can have a happy marriage. Whether they become parents or not is irrelevant. Kids are not the only stressors to a romantic relationship. Thus far, I have not been a very good teacher in the marriage department. So for them, I want to start a conversation, with myself and with others, to help them understand the work needed individually and as a couple to make a marriage last. 

I am too old to have a chance at a life-long marriage, and with a heart as heavy as mine, I don’t know that I have the courage to risk a third marriage (let alone a date). But that doesn’t quell my desire to be in a relationship where I can reflect back a few decades and say, just like all those wonderful couples whom I admire, including my dear grandparents, “Look at what we’ve endured; we made it.”  

For now, it’s back to being a single mom and doing what I can to help these five beautiful creatures rewrite their family history in a way that I could not.

picstitch me and kids

1,001 People That Suck: Are you one of them?

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This promotional post is part of a blog book tour taking place around the web this week. If you’d like to learn more about the book tour, feel free to tweet up with Pam Margolis (aka The Unconventional Librarian), a sister Philly Social Media Mom and the author of this post.

Author Kerri Kochanski is fed up with people that suck. And, she's taking 1,001 of them on in her book of the same title.

Author Kerri Kochanski is fed up with people that suck. And, she’s taking 1,001 of them on in her book of the same title.

Kerri Kochanski, Author of 1,001 People That Suck is fed up with bad humanity and unkind behavior, and is “calling people out.” Championing kindness, tolerance, and understanding, the book “publicly shames” people who commit social crimes. As these crimes generally go unpunished, offenders fail to suffer a consequence, and thus, their bad behavior and unkindness continues. The book, however, delivers a consequence. It “officially” (and entertainingly) identifies 1,001 people who engage in bad humanity and unkind behavior, and labels them as “people that suck.” Pointing out humorous, serious, and questionable instances that are “really, just not right,” the book skewers offenders, and condemns them in the process.

“If you think people behaving badly is not an epidemic, it is,” says Kochanski. There are over 2 million entries on Google and over 6 million videos on YouTube that reference “people suck.” People are disturbed by bad behavior. And by ignoring, downplaying or accepting unpleasantness, we are creating serious, larger issues. Bullies are causing children to commit suicide; road rage is causing drivers to kill other drivers by running them off the road – even stalking, assaulting and killing them. The bad guys are starting to win, and the good guys need to do something. “We’ve reached a tipping point; enough is enough.”

Commiserate and engage in discussion on the book’s blog, and join the conversation on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Aphrodisiac Recipes to heat up Valentine’s Day (er, night)

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My grandmother always advised me, the way to a man’s heart is through his stomach. I was probably a little too young for her to add that getting through to his libido wouldn’t hurt. Over the years, I’ve had fun (and success) preparing romantic meals, so this Valentine’s Day, I decided to revisit a few of my favorite aphrodisiac recipes in hopes of helping you (and me) catch Sir (or Ms.) Valentine’s attention.

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I can’t locate my copy, but there is a fabulous book called Intercourses, which aside from having tastefully erotic photos, is full of interesting tidbits about foods classified as aphrodisiacs, and easy to prepare, delicious recipes. The recipes featured here are not in that book, but once you start to learn about the different aphrodisiac foods, you can play around and create your own tantalizing dishes. First, you have to lose the kids (or the roommate). And get to the market.

Note: The weekend during which I intended to prepare and photograph the complete menu shared here, Philadelphia was experiencing a power outage of historic proportions. All photos featured here were borrowed from the “free to share and use” Bing library. 

Cocktail Hour… lemon-rosemary martini; figs with gorgonzola and pine nuts, warmed in the oven and drizzled with honey

For the martini:

Combine simple syrup and in a shaker with vodka or gin (2 oz. simple syrup to spirits). Shake over ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glasses. Garnish with a sprig of rosemary and a lemon twist. Optional: coat rims with sugar.

lemon rosemary martini

For the figs:

  • 2 whole, ripe figs, tops cut off to expose flesh & allow for cheese & pine nuts to be stuffed inside
  • small wedge of sharp gorgonzola cheese, softened
  • 1.5 tbsps. lightly toasted pine nuts
  • plain, lavender or orange-scented honey, for drizzling
  1. Press cheese and pine nuts into the top of each fig. Place in preheated oven (350°) and cook for about 10 minutes. The goal is to soften  and warm the fig, and for the gorgonzola to melt inside and over the fig
  2. Remove from oven and drizzle with honey. Serve immediately on a small plate with a tapas size fork. Or, get a little messy and devour with your hands (finger licking up to you). Continue reading

Teens and food allergies: No fun.

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Proud mentor moment: The young girl who I mentor via Mighty Writers just had her first guest blog published. Her topic: the “no fun” aspect of being a teen with food allergies. Miss Rave’n-Dajon Coleman‘s blogging niche is sports, so writing about food, and not in a gushing way, was a bit tough for her. I think she got to heart of what she was feeling: It’s no fun having to think so hard about what you eat when you’re a teenager and have plenty of other things to deal with.

I am sure our blog host, Carrie Curry, will appreciate you stopping by and leaving a comment. (We Philly Social Media Moms stick together.) And, if you have anyone in your family who is allergic to eggs, I also have a guest post on Chockababy, featuring non-egg recipes—another good reason to visit. Rave’n-Dajon’s post can be found on Chockababy’s homepage and also below. Thanks Carrie for putting Rave’n—and her allergies—in the spotlight.

My Allergy Challenge

Can you imagine being allergic to something you really love? Let me tell you about it. My mother describes the first time I suffered an allergic reaction. I was three years old and eating breakfast at daycare. I don’t know exactly what I ate but my mother later learned it contained egg products. After eating a small amount, my throat began to close, I couldn’t breathe, and I developed hives on my face. An ambulance was called and they injected me with medicine to stop the allergy attack.

As I got older I developed other allergies. I was not only allergic to egg products but peanut butter, walnuts, orange juice, oranges, strawberries, hotdogs, sausages, fish, bananas, grass, dust, cats, dogs, and not to mention soy, which is in everything you can think of.

I’m tired of hearing these words all the time, “Raven you can’t have that you’re allergic to it.” I especially hate when my mom gets worried when I try new foods. She stares at me making sure I won’t have a reaction. This makes it harder for me to enjoy discovering new flavors.

The hardest part about having millions of allergies is when you’re around family and friends and they don’t have to worry about being careful of what they eat. It’s so hard when ordering out with family. While they can order anything on the menu, I am limited to one or two items that I know won’t give me an allergic reaction. It’s tough to see everyone else eat everything while you are left out, but I have learned to live with it.

I have outgrown some of my allergies. I am no longer allergic to eggs, strawberries, orange juice, and I can now eat some foods that contain soy.

If you have a teenager in the house with allergies, you understand how challenging and frustrating it can be for both the parent and the teenager. However, it takes a lot of courage as a parent to allow the teenager the freedom to try new foods and not over-react.
—rdc

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Super Bowl Eats Countdown

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It’s been a while since I’ve posted here, which makes getting back into the routine akin to starting back at the gym after a few weeks off. The first workout, or in my case blog post, is the hardest to knock out. Lucky for me, one of my sister Philly Social Media Moms and kindred-spirit food fanatic, Heather McCurdy caught my eye on Facebook the other day with these tiny tacos. I am happy to send you her way, because not only is her blog fun to read, she has a bevy of delicious, simple to prepare recipes (served up with a side of sass) and more bite size app recipes in the oven. Thanks to her, my re-entry into READ.eat.DEW.write. is a Super Bowl of fun.

Before I send you over to Real the Kitchen and Beyond, scan your eyes south for a few more recipes to boost your Super Bowl repertoire. And, to satisfy those guests who really don’t give a hoot about the big game.

In the apps for dummies category, I have a super simple recipe made with mid-size portobello mushrooms, Whole Foods spinach and artichoke dip (packed in tubs and possibly in an artichoke-only version as well; in my stores they keep this type of stuff near the prepared foods counter), sun-dried tomato slivers and shredded manchego or locatelli cheese. I made this on a whim once and it was better than I expected. The steps are ridiculously easy and they look quite pretty when done. Alas, for this post, I don’t have an exact shot of the final product. However, the photo below will get your taste buds incentivized. I’ll try to make a batch ASAP and circle back with pics. In the meantime, what you really need to know is under the photo.

portobello Continue reading

Giving Tuesday: Think Globally, Act Locally

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JUST IN from the #GivingTuesday team: Game Day details. Click the icon to find out how you can show your support for the next 24+ hours. It’s not too late.

Get into the GIVING spirit and spend your time and money where it has the power to transform your community, and maybe even the world.

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Here’s the original post… 

Black Friday, Small Business Saturday, Cyber Monday… by now you’re likely familiar with these trending—and trendy—designated holiday shopping days. Lesser known, is Giving Tuesday, a philanthropic spin on conspicuous consumption. The initiative is picking up steam as we close in on this year’s day of giving, Tuesday, December 3. I enjoyed reading, earlier today, that Bill Gates posted about this on his LinkedIn page; big names behind causes typically result in people paying attention. Which, they seem to be doing.

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Type #GivingTuesday into your Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Tumblr search bars and you’ll be rewarded with all kinds of details, including what others are doing to show their support.  Continue reading

Lessons from Hurricane Sandy—& Save the Children

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“Disasters happen. It’s how we prepare for them that makes the difference.”

It’s hard to believe that one full year has passed since Hurricane Sandy roared up the East Coast and made landfall in New Jersey, killing at least 117 people and causing $50 billion in damage—the second costliest weather disaster in American history, behind Hurricane Katrina.

Though weather models warned of the potential destruction, coaxing evacuations, closing subways, rescheduling and repositioning trains and other public transportation—ultimately saving lives along the eastern shoreline of New Jersey, New York, Long Island and New England—families had very little to work with in preparing their children for the pending devastation.

During the storm, the foremost concern for parents with homes and children in Sandy’s path was physical safety. But in the days that followed, when electricity, food, water and shelter were scarce, and survival mode stretched on far beyond expectations, parents were tasked with managing their children’s mental state to a degree never before imagined.

The volatility of nature and technology spinning out of control is frightening for adults; the fear and trauma created for children even more so. Ultimately, as portrayed in the movie, “The Impossible,” the effect of familiar surroundings suddenly looking like a war zone, can leave children fretful for years.

“When disasters like Sandy end, the impact on children doesn’t. One of the most important parts of recovery is planning for the future.”

As you tune into the news today, you’ll likely hear numerous reflections of victims’ experiences, and feel the same sense of anxiety that many of us shared during newscasts and interviews a year ago. And, if they’re watching and listening alongside of you, so will your children. They may have questions about what you would do if another storm was predicted, and want reassurance that he/she, their friends, their pets, and everyone around them will be safe. You will readily supply all the right answers, but in your mind, be wondering how exactly, you might fulfill your promise to your child that, “everything will be OK.”

Save the Children has four words for you: Get Ready. Get Safe. And, in honor of all those who lost homes and family members just a year ago, they want you to start today

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Created to help families open up positive, proactive dialogue about the possibility and consequences of a natural disaster, the project also seeks to provide awareness and funding for families still recovering from Sandy. Reliving Sandy’s memories today, will quickly remind us all that protecting our children must be a priority across the country and around the globe. 

Natural disasters can’t be prevented, but families can be prepared. By clicking on the links throughout this post, and downloading the campaign’s thoughtful checklists, you and your family will be better equipped to navigate the unthinkable. And, you will also be better equipped to help your community build a safer, more efficient emergency plan.

Spend some time on the site, and if you’re interested in advocating for larger-scale prevention, you’ll find a link leading to state-specific emergency planning standards—something we should all be aware of. 

Thank you Save the Children for helping us to provide a safe haven for our most vulnerable population.

Pay it (fashion) forward

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CCC sale dates website page updated

I don’t know about you, but my wardrobe is looking a bit shabby these days. Ever since fall officially hit, I’ve been wearing the same sweater and leggings, or jeans, blouse and blazer combinations (ignoring dresses and dress pants completely)—looks saved only by good quality boots that fortunately make everything look better.

But with warm weather and its characteristic air of informality behind us, taking liberties with fashion is a definite don’t. Wander through the high-end stores at the King of Prussia mall, or hanging at any of the boutiques in town and in the ’burbs: Fall and winter in Philadelphia means polished looks—most successfully created with sumptuous fabrics and balanced combinations of classic and trendy styling.

Now, not all of us ladies can afford to make designer purchases, even once in a while. But that doesn’t mean we wouldn’t if we could.

So here’s the good news: This week, every woman in the Philadelphia area has a chance to get a piece of the designer fashion pie, and at jaw-dropping prices, thanks to Community Clothes Charity’s annual sale.

The Community Clothes Charity has had a large impact on Philadelphia and the Main Line ever since its original inception in 1957 to aid hospitalized war veterans. In 1977 the organization was restructured to its present form and name. Over the years this group has donated over $3.7M to many worthy beneficiaries. By recycling their own and others’ stylish fashions, this committee’s concept has been ecologically “green” for 56-plus years.

Before I dish the details, take a minute to picture yourself in some of the gorgeous clothing you’ve been ogling while flipping through the pages of Vogue. Imagine how great you’ll look and feel wrapped up in Chanel, Armani, Prada, Oscar de la Renta, Dior, Ferragamo, Gucci, Hermès, Pucci and more. Or how relieved you’ll be when you find that elusive dress you’ve been looking for, to get you through gala season or other milestone event that requires you to look like a million bucks—even if your bank account is just not quite there… yet.

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Kicking your wardrobe up a few notches is just one of the “wins” you’ll experience by attending the sale. The real reason to spend your hard-earned greenbacks, is to show support for this year’s two beneficiaries: Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech and Puppies Behind Bars (PBB), in acknowledgement for their Dog Tags: Service Dogs for Those Who’ve Served Us program. Anyone who has experienced the joy of owning a pet, will appreciate this organization’s main function, which is to offer prison-trained service dogs, free of charge, to physically and psychologically wounded veterans returning from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, spreading comfort and companionship.

Regarding the Clarke School, I’ve driven past its Bryn Mawr campus a number of times, but have never taken a tour. Based on conversations with a former trustee, with whom I spoke during Main Line Today days and again recently, this hardworking school is making a positive impact for families locally and along the East Coast.

Here in Philadelphia, the Clarke team works with families to educate schools, both public and private, about childhood hearing loss, along with the value of traditional academic placement post-on campus intervention. By building relationships with area schools and providing critical services, Clarke helps create positive outcomes for students striving to transition into traditional classrooms. Students requiring a higher level of support are equally represented. In fact, monies raised during the CCC sale, will be put toward a much-needed inclusive and accessible playground that will extend learning opportunities beyond the classroom and allow their students the freedom to play in a safe environment. Just think how much better you’re going to look and feel wearing a designer garment that has the power to make a difference.

Technologically, Clarke has some pretty neat bells and whistles; since you’re already online, why not click on the website? Or, if you would like to take a tour, contact Kate Hagarty, (610) 525-9600 ext. 110; khagarty@clarkeschools.org. Learning more might just make you feel extra motivated to get your clothes shopping on.

Now, back to the sale:

The five-day fundraiser kicks off with a Special Preview Day, Tues., 10/29, 1-6 p.m. pm. All you need to do to capitalize on the “early bird special,” is make a $30 tax-deductible donation at the door that day (this also gives free re-entry on Wednesday).

The sale continues on Wed., 10/30, 10 a.m.-8 p.m., with a $5 donation request at the door. (Entry is free all on the remaining days of the sale.)

On Thurs., 10/31 the sale runs from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. because of Halloween. Marked prices will be cut in half on both Fri., 11/1 (10 a.m.-4 p.m.) and Sat., 11/2, (9 a.m. -noon). 

The sale venue is The Village Hall, Eagle Village Shops, 503 West Lancaster Ave. (the intersection of Route 30 and Eagle Road), in Wayne, PA 19087. Cash, checks, Visa, and MasterCard will all be accepted.

While you’re waiting for doors to open on Tuesday, you can do a little cyber window shopping on Twitter and Facebook. I’ll see you there. Maybe wearing these…

CCC shoes

Sweet Smell of (hunger advocacy) Success

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In the better late than never category, I’d like to send out a not-so-gentle reminder on behalf of No Kid Hungry and Share our Strength.

…In just 10 days, this in-constant-action organization will wrap up its October initiative, spurred by two very generous “sugar daddies,” Domino Sugar and C&H Sugar.

Of course, I mean this is in the most positive interpretation of the colloquialism, because these two food industry superpowers have offered a dollar-for-dollar match on October’s Bake Sale No Kid Hungry proceeds.

If  you’ve been itching to get your baking on, NOW is the time to grease those pans, melt that butter and cover the counter in flour. (It’s a good excuse for your kids to make a mess without being scolded too!)

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Want to make a stand against hunger? A neighborhood or community bake sale is an effective—and tasty—way to get involved and make a positive impact.

The No Kid Hungry team is happy to receive your Bake Sale contributions all year long, but the promise of matching funds is irresistible—apparently to bakers across the country, who have raised $75,000-plus since October 1. Talk about “sweetening the pot;” at minimum now, a total value of $150,000. This is a big deal at a time when families are facing SNAP cuts along with a generally unstable economic foundation.

Whipping up a bake sale is easier than you think: With one weekend between now and October 31, and plenty of football, soccer and fall ball games happening at parks and schools across the country, you’ve got a captive audience. And, who wouldn’t want to bite into one (or three) of these tasty cupcakes (or these and these!). Click here for a gluten-free option. 

Spreading the word and showing support for food-challenged families through an old-fashioned bake sale is an affordable and fun way to get your community talking about hunger. Having that time and effort rewarded with a matching gift, is the icing on the cake.

Happy Baking!

Blog talk: On the Lineup

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I can’t be the only after-hours blogger longing for an extra six hours each day, hands that type as fast as I think, or a magic pill to spin less articulate thoughts into compelling copy… getting it right—and done on time—as a blogger is a daily challenge. But when I finally get a post up, and see that actual people are reading the words that I have labored over, it’s like eating a heaping, grandma-made bowl of pasta and meatballs after a long day of inconsequential noshes—sheer satisfaction.

And now that I finally got my latest post up on womenonbusiness.com, and passed along a few deliverable to clients, I am ready to dive into at least one of my upcoming posts. For starters, I have on the editorial lineup, a Q+A with Jay Jaboneta, founder of Yellow Boat of Hope, and a conversation with Val Haller, founder of music website Valslist.com and the writer behind “Music Match”. She’s got a new app coming out that is sure to be a hit on the holiday gift-giving list—from kids to parents.

Also coming up is a trio of culinary spotlights: Yellow Springs Farm (crazy good artisinal cheese maker), Wyebrook Farm, purveyors of organic beef, pork, chicken and eggs, and Boxcar Brewing Company (hopefully onsite tours of each)—all new food and drink resources discovered at Heritage Farm Fare a few weeks ago.

And, my Mighty Writers mentee is slated to deliver a guest post on our field trip to The Free Library of Philadelphia to see, listen to and get our jam on with author James McBride and his band. One of the coolest book reading/signing events that I’ve been to, I thought it would be neat to hear what a 15-year-old took away (aside from her first-ever autographed hardcover!).

Somewhere in here I plan to squeeze in a follow up to all the tweeting and posting, and most importantly, listening, I participated in during Social Good Summit 2013 in NYC. I’ve been wrestling with a few ways to tackle the endless possible angles, hence the delay. However, I am still on the #2030NOW high, and feel a sense of duty to help keep the mojo flowing and turn people onto this amazingly optimistic and powered up initiative.

And finally, I just learned that my good friend, Research Specialist at Monell Chemical Senses Center, musician and philosopher, has launched an online video talk show “Meeting of the Minds with Christopher Maute”. I am just getting up to speed on this, but after listening to him explain the central themes discussed on the air, I am curious to tune in. And, hopefully you will too—to these posts and others, as I continue to grow read.eat.DEW.write and keep up with all the interesting (and occasionally frustrating) happenings in the world.

Thanks for listening. Er, reading.