Category Archives: read.eat.dew.write

One more reason women rock: McNally Jackson book reading

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Nothing But the Truth

Love seeing my name listed on the cover along with so many talented female authors.

In the better late than never category, and particularly for those in and around Soho looking for something to do this evening, McNally Jackson is hosting several authors in support of A Band of Women’s latest project, Nothing But the Truth So Help Me God: 73 Women on Life’s Transitions. I will be joining a group of women whom I have never met, and am so looking forward to reading an excerpt of my essay, a reflection on dropping my developmentally disabled daughter off at Chapel Haven in Connecticut.

It is somewhat ironic that as I read about this incredible transition for my daughter, I am experiencing another life-changing moment. I am not so sure when I’ll be ready to write this story down, but when the call comes for Volume 2, I will likely be the first in line. It’s been a wonderful opportunity and I feel so fortunate, especially at a time when I am working very hard to get back on my feet and back into life. I thank all the women involved for lifting me up with their terrific stories and storytelling skills, and for making me feel proud and accomplished, even if just for 15 minutes.

Check out the book here. And if you are in the neighborhood, please join me and all these smart, articulate women at the McNally Jackson book reading. 7pm.

Here are the details:

Readers this evening: Sierra Trees, Janet Hanson, Jessie Braun, Ashley Collins, Heather Kristin, Dawn Warden-Reeder, Kat Hurley, Abby Ellin, and Shannon Weisleder. Wine and refreshments served.

Location: 52 Prince St., New York, New York 10012-3309

Teens and food allergies: No fun.

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Proud mentor moment: The young girl who I mentor via Mighty Writers just had her first guest blog published. Her topic: the “no fun” aspect of being a teen with food allergies. Miss Rave’n-Dajon Coleman‘s blogging niche is sports, so writing about food, and not in a gushing way, was a bit tough for her. I think she got to heart of what she was feeling: It’s no fun having to think so hard about what you eat when you’re a teenager and have plenty of other things to deal with.

I am sure our blog host, Carrie Curry, will appreciate you stopping by and leaving a comment. (We Philly Social Media Moms stick together.) And, if you have anyone in your family who is allergic to eggs, I also have a guest post on Chockababy, featuring non-egg recipes—another good reason to visit. Rave’n-Dajon’s post can be found on Chockababy’s homepage and also below. Thanks Carrie for putting Rave’n—and her allergies—in the spotlight.

My Allergy Challenge

Can you imagine being allergic to something you really love? Let me tell you about it. My mother describes the first time I suffered an allergic reaction. I was three years old and eating breakfast at daycare. I don’t know exactly what I ate but my mother later learned it contained egg products. After eating a small amount, my throat began to close, I couldn’t breathe, and I developed hives on my face. An ambulance was called and they injected me with medicine to stop the allergy attack.

As I got older I developed other allergies. I was not only allergic to egg products but peanut butter, walnuts, orange juice, oranges, strawberries, hotdogs, sausages, fish, bananas, grass, dust, cats, dogs, and not to mention soy, which is in everything you can think of.

I’m tired of hearing these words all the time, “Raven you can’t have that you’re allergic to it.” I especially hate when my mom gets worried when I try new foods. She stares at me making sure I won’t have a reaction. This makes it harder for me to enjoy discovering new flavors.

The hardest part about having millions of allergies is when you’re around family and friends and they don’t have to worry about being careful of what they eat. It’s so hard when ordering out with family. While they can order anything on the menu, I am limited to one or two items that I know won’t give me an allergic reaction. It’s tough to see everyone else eat everything while you are left out, but I have learned to live with it.

I have outgrown some of my allergies. I am no longer allergic to eggs, strawberries, orange juice, and I can now eat some foods that contain soy.

If you have a teenager in the house with allergies, you understand how challenging and frustrating it can be for both the parent and the teenager. However, it takes a lot of courage as a parent to allow the teenager the freedom to try new foods and not over-react.
—rdc

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Reflection & Prevention on Sandy Hook Anniversary

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(In collaboration with parenting strategist and licensed counselor, Tricia Ferrara, MA)

A lot of things are on my mind this week, but bubbling up to the surface is Sandy Hook’s anniversary, just hours away. I’ve managed to table my reaction regarding the public release of the 911 recordings (many news stations’ decision to not air them helped), but I’m a bit on edge amidst uncertainty over how the media is going to handle this very difficult and intimate memory in its retelling. The Associated Press’ decision to set up in Newtown has left me with mixed feelings, as I am sure it has others. Anyone following the news knows by now, that residents have requested that the media allow them to take in the day in privacy.

Before hearing that, I had been hopeful that the media would respect this request and refrain from deploying news trucks and reporters. Regardless, I have been, and still remain, anxious about what images will be shown on television; I could not watch any of the coverage last year when it happened; the radio broadcasts were barely manageable…

Like everyone else, it was too easy to put myself in those parents’ shoes, and to imagine my children in that scene. And a year later, I am in awe that these families, and this community, have managed to get up and participate in life, to do good things in the world and to stand together as an extended family. It is a beautiful way to honor those lost, and to honor the children, families and teachers that are very much alive today, filling Newtown with new, joyful memories. The people of Newtown have given each other the greatest gift possible in the aftermath of such tragedy: a future.  Continue reading

high anxiety: moving over to wordpress.org…

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…taking my blog to the next level—without destroying it in the process; the upgrade required me to restore default settings which amounted to a lackluster font. (Not an easy click to make since I am a font-forward writer.) But because I am so thrilled to be building a following, and want to be as professional as possible with this recent writing endeavor, it makes sense to step up and get in the ring where the big kids play. And, I also happily discovered a few fonts I can live with until the big switch is active. Then, I’ll be thinking on a new design, again to look as pro as possible. Showing personality is good, but doing it with truly slick style is even better. Feel free to send over any advice you WordPress design experts.

In the meantime, I’ll keep posting—and keep y’all posted. Ready, set, go…