Daily Archives: January 18, 2014

Teens and food allergies: No fun.

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Proud mentor moment: The young girl who I mentor via Mighty Writers just had her first guest blog published. Her topic: the “no fun” aspect of being a teen with food allergies. Miss Rave’n-Dajon Coleman‘s blogging niche is sports, so writing about food, and not in a gushing way, was a bit tough for her. I think she got to heart of what she was feeling: It’s no fun having to think so hard about what you eat when you’re a teenager and have plenty of other things to deal with.

I am sure our blog host, Carrie Curry, will appreciate you stopping by and leaving a comment. (We Philly Social Media Moms stick together.) And, if you have anyone in your family who is allergic to eggs, I also have a guest post on Chockababy, featuring non-egg recipes—another good reason to visit. Rave’n-Dajon’s post can be found on Chockababy’s homepage and also below. Thanks Carrie for putting Rave’n—and her allergies—in the spotlight.

My Allergy Challenge

Can you imagine being allergic to something you really love? Let me tell you about it. My mother describes the first time I suffered an allergic reaction. I was three years old and eating breakfast at daycare. I don’t know exactly what I ate but my mother later learned it contained egg products. After eating a small amount, my throat began to close, I couldn’t breathe, and I developed hives on my face. An ambulance was called and they injected me with medicine to stop the allergy attack.

As I got older I developed other allergies. I was not only allergic to egg products but peanut butter, walnuts, orange juice, oranges, strawberries, hotdogs, sausages, fish, bananas, grass, dust, cats, dogs, and not to mention soy, which is in everything you can think of.

I’m tired of hearing these words all the time, “Raven you can’t have that you’re allergic to it.” I especially hate when my mom gets worried when I try new foods. She stares at me making sure I won’t have a reaction. This makes it harder for me to enjoy discovering new flavors.

The hardest part about having millions of allergies is when you’re around family and friends and they don’t have to worry about being careful of what they eat. It’s so hard when ordering out with family. While they can order anything on the menu, I am limited to one or two items that I know won’t give me an allergic reaction. It’s tough to see everyone else eat everything while you are left out, but I have learned to live with it.

I have outgrown some of my allergies. I am no longer allergic to eggs, strawberries, orange juice, and I can now eat some foods that contain soy.

If you have a teenager in the house with allergies, you understand how challenging and frustrating it can be for both the parent and the teenager. However, it takes a lot of courage as a parent to allow the teenager the freedom to try new foods and not over-react.
—rdc

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